Last edited by Dasida
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Epistle to the Philippians. found in the catalog.

Epistle to the Philippians.

by Robert Rainy

  • 236 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by A. C. Armstrong in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bible. N.T. Philippians -- Commentaries -- To 1900

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesThe Expositor"s Bible. Philippians
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 368 p. ;
    Number of Pages368
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23358830M

    Paul and the Philippians. Lesson 5 in the series Paul's Prison Epistles. Examines Paul's letter of hope and encouragement for the times of persecution and distress he and the Philippians faced. Introduction to the Epistle to the Philippians. This morning we begin our study of Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians. This is a study that I have been looking foreword to for quite some time, yet I am glad that I was not able to start it sooner.

    The Epistle to the Philippians, commonly referred to as Philippians, is a Pauline epistle of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. The epistle is attribu.   For these reasons and others, Philippians is a book of the Bible that deserves not just our routine reading but our careful study and meditation. Even now, prayerfully ponder the last few verses from the first chapter, which aptly summarize Paul’s aims and themes in Philippians.

    Previous | Index | Next >> "THE EPISTLE TO THE PHILIPPIANS" Introduction AUTHOR: The apostle Paul (), joined in his salutation by al references by the author (; ; ; ) are certainly consistent with what we know of Paul from other New Testament 's authorship of this letter is also supported by the testimony of early "church fathers" such as. Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians in Six Discussions Chi Alpha New Orleans Discussion 2: Paul’s Chains and Paul’s Joy () Text: 12 Now I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel. 13 As a result, it has become clear throughout the wholeFile Size: KB.


Share this book
You might also like
Toward an integrated theory of development

Toward an integrated theory of development

Advanced dungeons & dragons

Advanced dungeons & dragons

Festival of Britain and design history

Festival of Britain and design history

Tagore, India and Soviet Union

Tagore, India and Soviet Union

Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer

Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer

Inventory of the archives of the [name of government or organization]

Inventory of the archives of the [name of government or organization]

internal market after 1992

internal market after 1992

Harcourt Horizons States and Regions - Teacher Edition Volume 1 (of 2) (Horizons)

Harcourt Horizons States and Regions - Teacher Edition Volume 1 (of 2) (Horizons)

The Secrets of a Fire King

The Secrets of a Fire King

Kirklees street by street.

Kirklees street by street.

Emergency medical procedures for the backpacker

Emergency medical procedures for the backpacker

Modelling of batch dextransucrase production

Modelling of batch dextransucrase production

Two tactics, one aim

Two tactics, one aim

Maybe you belong in a zoo!

Maybe you belong in a zoo!

Epistle to the Philippians by Robert Rainy Download PDF EPUB FB2

The joy of the Christian experience is the dominant theme running through the book of Philippians. The words "joy" and "rejoice" are used 16 times in the epistle. The Apostle Paul wrote the letter to express his gratitude and affection for the Philippian church, his strongest supporters in ministry.

The Epistle To The Philippians Introduction AUTHOR The apostle Paul (), joined in his salutation by al references by the author (; ; ; ) are certainly consistent with what we know of Paul from otherNew Testament sources. Paul's authorship of this letter is also supported by the testimony of early.

The Epistle to the Philippians (The New International Greek Testament Commentary) Paperback – Ap by Peter T. O'Brien (Author) out of 5 stars 23 ratings. Book 11 of 13 in the New International Greek Testament Commentary Series. See all 7 formats and editions Hide Cited by: Philippians is one of Paul’s shortest letters and one of the smallest books in the New Testament but there are such powerful teachings in this little dynamo.

Check out this commentary, summary and key verses from the book of Philiipians. Author: Philippians identifies the author of the Book of Philippians as the apostle Paul, likely along with the help of Timothy. Date of Writing: The Book of Philippians was written in approximately A.D. Purpose of Writing: The Epistle to the Philippians, one of Paul’s prison epistles, was written in Rome.

It was at Philippi, which the apostle visited on his second missionary journey. Greetings from Paul and Timothy (2 Samuel ; 1 Chronicles ; Colossians )1 Paul and Timothy, servants of Christ Jesus.

To all the saints in Christ Jesus at Philippi, together with the overseers and deacons: 2 Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Thanksgiving and Prayer. The book of Philippians is a Prison Epistle (letter written while in prison). Paul wrote it about 62 A.D.

as he anticipated his release from prison. They key personalities are the Apostle Paul, Timothy, Epaphroditus, Euodia, and Syntyche. It was written to show his appreciation and love to the Philippians in a thank-you letter for their.

Book of Philippians. Suggested result. Philippians 1 [Full Chapter] [ Greetings from Paul] This letter is from Paul and Timothy, slaves of Christ Jesus.

I am writing to all of God’s holy people in Philippi who belong to Christ Jesus, including the church leaders and deacons. May God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ give you grace and peace.

The Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians (commonly abbreviated Pol. Phil.) is an epistle attributed to Polycarp, an early bishop of Smyrna, and addressed to the early Christian church in Philippi. It is widely believed to be a composite of material written at two different times (see § Unity), in the first half of the second century.

The epistle is described by Irenaeus as follows. The Epistle To The Philippians. Chapter One. OBJECTIVES IN STUDYING THIS CHAPTER. 1) To appreciate why the Philippians were a source of great joy to Paul 2) To learn from Paul's attitude concerning persecution, death, and the purpose of life.

SUMMARY. Paul begins his epistle with his customary salutation followed by an expression of. Summary of The Book of Philippians.

Purpose. One of the obvious reasons that Paul wrote his letter to the Philippians was to thank them for their generous offering. He also wanted to commend the unselfishness of Epaphroditus, as well as informing them of.

A Map of Philippi and Surrounding Regions The City of Philippi and the Origin of the Church There The city of Philippi, as one can see from the map, is located in north eastern Greece (Macedonia). The city was already ancient by the time Paul arrived there around 49 CE (Acts ).

In fact, its beginnings go back to the fourth century BCE when it was occupied by the Thracians. The Epistle to the Philippians (New International Greek Testament Com book.

Read 11 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This commenta /5. The Epistle (or letter) to the Philippians is a short book in the New is a letter to the church at Philippi in Macedonia from Saint was written while Paul was in jail for telling people about Jesus.

This is the holy book of Philippians, known as "The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Philippians". The recording is dramatized, from the King James.

The Epistle to the Philippians, the 11th book in the New Testament of the Bible, was written by Saint Paul to the Philippians - a Christian community in eastern Macedonia - from prison in Ephesus in AD 57 or, as some scholars believe, in Rome in the early 60s.

Some scholars think that the present letter is a composite of three different ones. Philippians is often overlooked, with much more attention usually given to Romans, Galatians, and 1 Corinthians.

Barth shows why Philippians should not be overlooked. Given the parallels In a relatively short amount of space, Barth takes the short Pauline Epistle, line by line/5. The Rom. origin of the epistle may be accepted as the most probable.

Neither of the alternative views offers evidence sufficiently strong to overturn this long established view. Date. If written at Rome, the date of Philippians falls in the early 60s, prob. during the early part of a.d.

If an Ephesian origin is accepted, it must be. The Epistles of the Bible are all found in the New Testament. They include 21 of the New Testament’s 27 books, extending from Romans to Jude. Thirteen of these Epistles were written by the apostle Paul: Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, and Philemon.

throughout the Epistle. Like golden threads, “joy” and its kindred words run throughout Philippians, as “grace” does in Ephesians. The city of Philippi, a Roman colony, was situated about eight miles inland from its port, Neapolis, the modern Kavalla.

Not being a commercial center, this may explain the paucity of Jews among the. Philippians and suggest that it was written from Rome, although some commentators argue for Caesarea or Ephesus. Paul’s life was at stake, and he was evidently awaiting the verdict of the Imperial Court ().

THE CHRIST OF PHILIPPIANS. The great (kenosis) passage is one of several portraits of Christ in this epistle.THE EPISTLE TO THE PHILIPPIANS. On the northernmost shore of the Greek Archipelago, as it is now called, or of the Mgean Sea, as it used to be called, was the city of Philippi.

If you look upon the map you will see that northward from this northern shore of the Greek Archipelago there stretches a great rocky barrier, which separates now, as it did then, the Turkish peninsula from the Greek.Epistle to the Philippians A book of the New Testament.

Communications had already passed between the Christians of Philippi and Paul, not only when he was at Thessalonica (iv. ), but at some subsequent period (iv. 18), when Epaphroditus had brought him a present of money from them.